Tuesday’s Truth – Building Small

Hello again!

Look at me – two weeks in a row!  This week let’s look at some truth about the work we do for God. We’re told to do everything we do as if we’re doing it for God. (Colossians 3:23) Often, that leads to us comparing our work to what others are doing, and we start to lie to ourselves that our work or service is not as worthwhile as someone else’s. We think teaching Sunday school is nothing compared to running a clinic in a developing country. Or that homeschooling our children can’t hold a candle to writing Bible studies used across the globe. I know that I have fallen into this trap many times. It’s such a natural thing to compare ourselves with others, even though God looks at us each individually. (Psalm 139:1-3)

Just a few weeks ago in my ladies’ Bible study group, we were discussing this very idea. We were reading about how God has called and equipped each one of us for specific tasks. (2 Corinthians 3:5) He hasn’t done that just for the people in big, powerful, well-known positions. He’s done it for you, stay at home mom, and for you, corporate accountant, and you, middle school teacher. He has called and equipped you for your job, for your volunteer service, and for your relationships. (Ephesians 2:10) Each one is important in His grand plan. One of the women in my group, whom I would say had certainly done some big things for God, related how she never really felt like she was given a calling or anointing for God’s work, even though she worked for Him faithfully. She felt this way because she had faced so many struggles, and had often seen little results. I felt so sad that she was discouraged, but I realized that many of us feel that way.

Sometimes we don’t see the results because we are trying to do good works outside of doing the works God has planned for us. But I think that more often, we simply fail to see the results because we are looking for the wrong thing. We have lied to ourselves by thinking that only “big” results count. If it doesn’t win an award or show up on the news, it’s not a big deal. But here’s the truth: everything we do counts, and everything we do for God has a result.(Luke 16:10) If we limit ourselves to only doing things we think will have big results, we are cheating ourselves and others out of God’s blessings.

An analogy here would be great works of art and architecture. Often, the great master painters would have their students and apprentices help them with parts of large paintings. These students would paint the scenery, the clothing, the “accessories”, if you will. What would those great classics be without those details? Not nearly as beautiful, that’s for sure. And yet, how many of those students are remembered by name today? Do we visit museums to see “the wonderful palm tree painted by Fransico in 1487”? No. And yet that palm tree is a crucial part of the painting as a whole. Likewise, think of the great cathedrals and castles built hundreds of years ago. Master stonecutters shaped each block of stone just perfectly so that the whole building would fit together in beauty and strength. Glaziers made, cut, and arranged pieces of glass to make gorgeous and instructive windows. But here’s the quiz: can you name a famous stone mason or glazier of the 18th century? No? Why not? What about a famous architect? Probably yes, and if you can’t think of one off the top of your head, a quick trip to the internet search will find you several. Those stonecutters and glaziers aren’t’ remembered for their work, and we don’t ooh and aah over every stone in the great cathedrals of Europe, and yet each one is a critical part of the whole.

Chances are that you are not going to become a household name for teaching the 2-year-olds on Sunday mornings, for raising your children, for teaching 8th-grade math, for keeping immaculate books, or for being a good friend. But those things matter. Love shown matters. Listening and comforting matter. Integrity matters. Compassion matters. Honesty matters. Generosity matters.  Faithfulness matters.

I’ll leave you with this thought. No one really remembers or talks about Nikola and Drana Bojaxhiu, Macedonians of Albanian descent. They were simply faithful Christians and parents who did what they knew God would want them to by raising their children and showing compassion to the poor of their city. They modeled Christ-like love and kindness in front of their daughter Agnes, and she learned her lesson well. After finishing her schooling in Macedonia, Agnes felt called by God to enter a life of service to Him. She joined a religious order in Ireland, and from there went to India, where she taught in schools, and eventually moved on to working with the poorest outcast Indians in the slums of Calcutta (Kolkata). She served in India for over 50 years, reaching not just the poor, but people across the globe with the love of Christ. You probably know Agnes better as Mother Teresa. Did her parents know what their daughter would become? They could not have. But they did know what kind of person they wanted to raise her to be, and they were faithful to that calling. What they did as parents and Christians did not seem big at the time they were doing it, but if they had not been faithful, millions would have missed out on the impact that their daughter was to have.

So be encouraged, friends. The great things in life are built out of small things. Keep building!

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